What happens to the lock of hair at the end of the poem?

What happens to the lock of hair at the end of the poem?

Toward the end of the poem, the lock of Belinda’s hair transformed into a heavenly body or into a constellation. “The Rape of the Lock” is a deride epic or a “heroicomical poem” as Pope depicts it in the epigraph.

How would you characterize Belinda in these lines?

Belinda is upper class, high-strung and conceited. She is lovely and used to being told she is beautiful. She is the type of girl one would expect to have “a favorite curl”.

What happens to the sylph that slips between the blades of the scissors?

What happens to one unfortunate Sylph as he attempts to block the shears from cutting the hair? He got cut in two, but is quickly restored.

What does Clarissa help the baron do to Belinda and what struggle results from it?

What does Clarissa help the baron do to Belinda and what struggle results from it? Clarissa hands the baron her scissors and he tries to cut her hair. The first time the wind pushes it away from him, the second time she turns but looks back.

What happens in the card game in lines 29 54?

Summerize: What Happens in the card game in lines 29-54? The cards of Belinda’s opponents in this game are described as “armies” The capture of cards is described in terms of war casualties. Belinda defeats the Baron as she has a King of Hearts and he has a Ace of Hearts. Which constitutes a win in the game Ombre.

How does Belinda defeat the baron?

Belinda and the Baron meet in combat and she emerges victorious by peppering him with snuff and drawing her bodkin. Having achieved a position of advantage, she again demands that he return the lock.

Why does the baron want Belinda’s hair?

She is the center of attention, with everybody admiring the two locks of hair on her neck. The Baron is filled with the desire to take one of Belinda’s locks and to show it off. He has called upon all spirits to help him in taking the lock, in particular the Spirit of Love.

What are Belinda’s cosmetic powers?

The remaining weapons in Belinda’s arsenal are her eyes. This seems natural enough, but Belinda still relies on cosmetic powers to win back her lock. When she first prepares herself at the toilette, she puts on her face with the assurance that she can use her feminine appeal like a weapon, a force to reckon with.

How would you characterize Pope’s attitude towards Belinda?

This willing indifference leads Ariel to believe that she is amorously inclined toward a gallant. To sum up Pope’s attitude to Belinda is very mixed and complicated, mocking and yet tender, admiring and yet critical.